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Figure Skating Codes of Conduct


The essential elements of character building and ethics in sports are embodied
in the concept of sportsmanship and six core principles: respect, responsibility,
fairness, caring, trustworthiness and good citizenship. The highest potential of
sports is achieved when competition reflects these “six pillars of character”.
  
Examples of a Figure Skating Codes of Conduct Agreements
       As a condition of joining the club, it is highly recommended that all members of a skating club - skaters and parents of minor children - read and sign the Skating Club Code of Conduct Agreement.

       Parents need to become familiar with the contents in these documents and sign the following:
       These agreements are signed on an annual basis as all members and/or parents are bound by U.S. Figure Skating rules (GR 1.02-1.03. Code of Ethics and Code of Conduct).

       The Skater's Code of Conduct - This is a code of conduct for skaters to abide by at all club sessions.

       The Code of Conduct must be observed for safety and to ensure that everyone can make effective use of their ice time without creating unnecessary problems. Suggested rules include:
  • Pay attention to the position of other skaters at all times. Be especially alert for reverse jumpers.
  • All skaters, coaches, and parents are expected to treat others with respect.
  • Parents and other skaters are requested not to interrupt coaches while lessons are in progress.
  • "Right-of-way" goes first to the skater in a harness, then to the soloist, then to the skaters in a lesson.
Note: Generally there are multiple lessons being conducted at the same time. Most sessions have provisions for identifying a skater performing their program. The rules require other skaters to avoid undue interference with the skaters who have the "right-of-way". Skaters having the "right-of-way" must also remember to keep an alert eye open to avoid collisions.  Screaming at the top of your lungs "excuse me" is not acceptable!
  • When standing on the ice near the boards, make sure you're not going to cut someone off when entering the flow of skaters.
  • Look in the direction of traveling forward and backward. Look to the where the body is leaning - inside the circle.
  • Do not sit or lie on the ice. Get up as quickly as possible after falling.
  • Avoid skating in the Lutz corners of the rink for prolonged periods as this impedes other skaters' ability to perform their elements and programs. Be especially aware of your surroundings when you are in these corners as the approach of the Lutz is blind and frequently is telegraphed (excessively long). The skater doing the Lutz is not likely to see you.
  • Avoid skating in the center of the rink for prolonged periods as this impedes the ability of other skaters' to perform the elements of their programs that crisscross the center.
  • If you must carry on an extended conversation (socializing) - get off the ice. Such an activity on the ice wastes expensive ice time and interferes with other skaters' training while presenting an stationary hazard for skaters to avoid.
  • Sitting on the boards or climbing over the boards is not permitted.
  • Eating, chewing gum or drinking (with the exception of drinking water from plastic bottles used by runners) is not permitted on the ice.
  • Pushing, shoving, throwing snow or intentionally damaging the ice surface by kicking is not permitted.
  • Solo music will be played using an established system to insure fairness; however, a priority would be given to a coach's request for a lesson.
  • Coaches may request solo music for a skater during a lesson only.
  • Skaters my request solo music up to twice per session, unless played in lesson. This rule may be relaxed for sessions that are not busy.
  • Abide by session designations: No dance, MITF skills or prolonged stroking exercises will be allowed on Free Skating sessions, and no free skating (jumps or spins) will be allowed on Dance and MITF sessions.
  • Abide by session criteria: skate only on sessions for which you qualify. Requests for exceptions may be made in writing to the Board for club sessions and from rink management for sessions the rink controls.
  • When the buzzer sounds and the Zamboni doors open, the session is over. Stop skating, help patch holes if requested, and clear the ice quickly.
Ice Etiquette & Right-of-Way -
       Skating is basically an individual sport, and activities during most practice sessions are pretty unstructured. Some basic rules must be observed for safety and to ensure that everyone can make effective use of their ice time. The club has its own set of rules, and you should be sure to know and follow them. All skaters above JD level are required to read, sign and return the Skaters' Code of Conduct when registering.

       Club has growth may occur in significantly more beginning skaters. These numbers are subject to attrition as the skaters progress towards earning a gold test medal. The limited ice time will require more advanced sessions to include several skill levels to pay the ice fees.

Courtesy -
       Respect the rights of other skaters and be constantly aware of who is around you. If you seem to be surrounded by skaters of significantly greater or lesser skills, be especially careful! Strive to avoid collisions!

       All skaters, coaches, parents and volunteers are to be treated with respect.

       Do not interrupt coaches when they are giving lessons.

Follow Session Designation and Criteria
       Session designations may be divided into skill levels:

  • Free Style -No dance, skills or prolonged stroking exercises allowed.
  • Dance includes dance spins and lifts during breaks  - no free skating allowed.
  • Free Dance and Pair sessions - couples only.
  • MITF sessions - no free skating or dance allowed.

Priority/Right of Way
       The 'right of way' goes first to the skater in a harness, then to the soloist (whose music is playing), then to the skaters in a lesson. The skater performing the program must also keep an alert eye open. Note that there are usually multiple lessons at the same time. Other skaters must avoid undue interference with the skaters who have the "right of way". Skaters having the 'right of way' must also remember to keep an alert eye open to avoid collisions and may respectfully remind others of 'right of way' e.g. 'excuse me', except when both skaters have equal 'right of way'.

Dangerous Singles Moves
       When you are practicing elements like camel spins and back spirals be especially aware of the danger your exposed blade poses to other skaters. Recognize that once you've started the element it will be hard for you to see those around you. Take a good look at your expected "space" before you start the element, and abort it if it looks like you could cause a problem. Other skaters are expected to give the skater free maneuvering room once performing such an element.

Rink Corners attract skaters performing "Lutz" jumps
       Because of the nature of the Lutz jump, it is most commonly performed in opposite corners of the rink. These corners are informally called the "Lutz Corners". Strive to avoid long-term practice activities in these corners, and be especially aware of your surroundings when you are in them. The approach to a Lutz is long and blind. The skater doing the Lutz is not likely to see you.

Falls and Injuries
       If you fall, get up quickly. Other skaters will have a much harder time seeing you when you are down low on the ice. Don't stay there any longer than you have to. While falling, keep your fingers away from your blades. Learn to fall properly so that you can protect your head as much as possible. Learn to keep "loose" when you fall and this will help you to avoid breaking things.

       If you see someone else is that has fallen and may be injured, don't just drag them off without being certain that doing so won't hurt them further. If you suspect that someone is seriously hurt, the best thing to do is -

  1. Have someone stand "guard" over them to make sure that other skaters avoid collisions with them,
  2. Get a qualified adult to come and help them.

Predictability
       As you skate more, you'll get to the point where you'll recognize that a practice session has a certain "rhythm" to it. People tend to do pretty "expectable" or "predictable" things, and you can usually pretty much guess where somebody else is going, based on what they're doing when you see them (the normal approaches to each jump or spin are pretty recognizable). Try not to skate or behave in a way that would surprise other skaters. If you're standing near the boards, don't enter the flow of skaters without checking to make sure you're not going to get into someone else's way. Be especially alert for reverse direction skaters.

General Expectations

  • Be aware of other skaters' positions at all times, especially before entering the ice or starting from a stopped position. Be especially alert for reverse jumpers.

  • Look in the direction of travel when skating backwards.

  • Refrain from standing around and visiting on the ice. This wastes expensive ice and presents an additional hazard for other skaters to avoid.

  • No skaters may push, pull, grab or purposely bump into other skaters. Games such as Snap the Whip or any form of tag cannot be played. Skaters cannot make or throw snowballs. Kicking or digging holes in the ice is forbidden. Skaters should help fill the normal caused by toe jumps.

  • No food or drink on the ice (this includes chewing gum).

  • No large hair barrettes, hair baubles, or jewelry

  • Skaters should avoid skating in the center of the rink as this impedes on the other skaters' ability to perform their programs.

  • Coaches may request solo music up to twice per session if played in lesson. This rule may be relaxed for sessions that are not busy.

  • When the buzzer sounds and the Zamboni doors open the session is over. Skaters should immediately stop skating, help patch holes if requested and clear the ice quickly.

  • When the buzzer sounds and the Zamboni doors open the session is over. Coaches should immediately stop teaching and quickly clear the ice.

Helmet Use
       In Canada, all CanSkaters must wear helmets. It is strongly recommended that beginner skaters of all ages wear helmets to avoid serious head injuries.

Recommended Reading:

PDF U.S. Figure Skating Parents Code of Conduct U.S. Figure Skating Parents Code of Conduct. Codes of Conduct give everyone a guide to what is expected of us if we are part of an organization. 

References:

PDF US Figure Skating Technical Panel Code of Ethics US Figure Skating. TECHNICAL PANEL CODE OF ETHICS. 1. Persons Subject to this Code. The Code of Ethics for the Technical Panel applies to all individuals.

Code of Conduct - Panthers Figure Skating Club In order to have a safe and incredible time here, we have prepared a Student Code of Conduct that describes important rules for skaters to follow.

PDF Synchronized Skater's Handbook - Oxford Skating Club sanctioned by United States Figure Skating in early 1980, has had team skaters ... Club Expectations of the OSC Skater – The Skater's Code of Conduct.

Skater's Code of Conduct - Kitsilano Figure Skating Club The code of conduct is to be observed for safety and to ensure that everyone can make effective use of their ice time. All skaters are expected to treat others with respect.

Resources:

The following internet links have been gleaned from personal communications
combined with information from public institutions and athletic organizations/
associations that have a web presence with information concerning team and
individual sports programs:

  
  
   
Figure Skating Codes of Conduct
   
   
Hockey Skating Codes of Conduct
PDF  Practice Session Code for Skaters
PDF  How to Dress For Figure Skating

All materials are copy protected. 
The limited use of the materials for education purposes is allowed providing
credit is given for the source of the materials.


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