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Child Care - Preschool
& After School Programs



    With an increasing number of families with both parents working full time outside of the home and single family head of households, child care becomes an even more important consideration.

    There are private and publicly run not-for-profit programs available through schools, churches, park & recreation departments, and a stand alone for-profit businesses.

    Every community should have a program that provides services for our youngest and oldest members. Each group needs an environment that enriches their lives by supporting the continued development of their social, physical, and mental abilities.

    Ideally a comprehensive recreational center will be able to partner with a local university to develop a program of positive learning experiences that can utilize advanced university students who will help to staff the various programs to acquire hands on practice experience under the direction of their professors and experienced staff personnel.

    Visit the Child Care program at USC web site.  The USC Child Care Program is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). NAEYC accreditation is a national, voluntary system to measure the quality of child care centers, preschools and kindergartens, and to help these programs improve.

UC San Diego Child Care Program  UC San Diego offers full-time child care programs at the Early. Childhood Education Center and a part-time child care program at the Mesa Child Development Center.

Ann Arbor School Age Child Care Program  Community Education and Recreation offers child care programs in the Ann Arbor Public Schools, including before and after school care.

Child Care Program access allows parents enroll in school. This program supports the participation of low-income parents in post secondary education through the provision of campus based child care.

    The following examples provide an overview of what can be offered to expand the educational, social, and athletic opportunities that are offered in most public, charter, and religious schools:

Pre-School Programs
Infants
Age-appropriate activities promote cognitive and social development in a warm, nurturing environment.
Toddlers
A program that offers a balance of nurturing, playtime, and learning throughout the day.
Pre-School for 2 year olds
A fun, yet challenging learning environment for a two year old's short attention span.
Pre-School age 3 to 4
A program of daily activities designed to develop a child acquire academic and social skills.
Pre-Kindergarten
A curriculum designed to prepare a child for the next exciting phase — kindergarten!
Kindergarten
A skill-based program designed to prepare children for the first grade and for success in school.
Before & After school
Program designed to help children discover a sense of who they are and what they can do if provided the opportunity.
Enrichment
A learning based program that stresses the adventures of dealing with new learning experiences.
Advanced
Exposure to the arts and sports activities.

Elementary School Programs
Before & After school
Program designed to help children discover a sense of who they are and what they can do if provided the opportunity.
Enrichment
A learning based program that stresses the adventures of learning experiences in individual and group activities.
Advanced
Exposure to the arts and sciences, with an exphasis on music, drawing, and performing arts.

Middle and High School Programs

Before & After school
Program designed to help children discover a sense of who they are and what they can do if provided the opportunity.
Enrichment
A learning based program that stresses the exploration of learning experiences and dealing with developing problem solving skills.
Advanced
Exposure to the arts and sciences, with an exphasis on computer science, techology and languages,

    
A win-win situation can be achieved if a seniors activity center is also held at the same facility as active retired members of a community are a real asset whose years of life experiences and skills can form a foundation for a volunteers assisting pre-school and school age children.

Sources of potential Child Care Providers include the following:

  • Retired community members -
    • Mentoring a child by serving as a surrogate parent at sports practice sessions to provide positive encouragement and supervision of behavior.
      • A contract form signed by parents and athletes agreeing to arrangement - no fee
    • Tutoring athletes and providing encouragement to complete homework in a timely fashion and urging them to strive to do their very best.
      • A contract form signed by parents and athletes agreeing to arrangement - volunteer supported; no fee
    • Transportation from school to rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a signed permission slip from parent(s)
    • Stepping in if an athlete becomes ill or injured at rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a medical authorization form signed by parent(s)
  • Cooperative Groups of Parents -
    • Transportation from school to rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a signed permission slip from parent(s)
    • Stepping in if an athlete becomes ill or injured at rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a medical authorization form signed by parent(s)
  • Managers of Hockey, Speed, Curling, Synchronized Skating and Theater On Ice Teams
    • Transportation from school to rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a signed permission slip from parent(s) - volunteer supported; no fee
    • Stepping in if an athlete becomes ill or injured at rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a medical authorization form signed by parent(s) - volunteer supported; no fee
  • Non-Profit Child Care Providers -
    • Provide positive encouragement and supervision of behavior.
      • A contract form signed by parents and athletes agreeing to arrangement - fee based
    • Stepping in if an athlete becomes ill or injured at rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a medical authorization form signed by parent(s) - volunteer supported; no fee
    • Tutoring athletes and providing support to complete homework in a timely fashion and urging them to strive to do their very best.
      • A contract form signed by parents and athletes agreeing to arrangement - volunteer supported; no fee
  • For-Profit Child Care Providers -
    • Provide positive encouragement and supervision of behavior.
      • A contract form signed by parents and athletes agreeing to arrangement - fee based
    • Stepping in if an athlete becomes ill or injured at rink/recreation center.
      • Requires a medical authorization form signed by parent(s) - fee based
    • Tutoring athletes and providing support to complete homework in a timely fashion and urging them to strive to do their very best.
      • A contract form signed by parents and athletes agreeing to arrangement - fee based
References:

Making the decision to become a nonprofit child care provider ...
Nonprofit centers may qualify for higher levels of reimbursement for participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

How to Start a Nonprofit Child Care Center | eHow.com

Profit Or Non-Profit Child Care
Learn about the difference between profit and non profit child care centers and how to choose the right center for your child.

For-Profit Versus Non-Profit Childcare Providers - Associated ...
Feb 4, 2008 ... When considering childcare options, it is important to look at the organization's financial structure, including those that are "for-profit"

Why Child Care (aka Day Care) is a Non-Profit Enterprise, ...
May 28, 2008 ... Tags: child care, day care, Minnesota Supreme Court, nonprofit status, ... By disallowing nonprofit child care centers to benefit from non-profit tax laws

Administrative models in profit and nonprofit child care ...
Comparison of the profit and non-profit child care centers in this study. The rationalistic model is characterized by bureaucracy and a hierarchy of

Starting a Child Care Center: Funding and Information ...
Each type has advantages and disadvantages to consider in establishing a child care facility along with the decision to establish either a nonprofit or for

Childcare Worldwide. A non-profit child Sponsorship Faith ...
Childcare Worldwide (CCW), formerly, Childcare International (CCI) is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Contributions are fully tax deductible.

The Y: Youth Development
That's why child care at the Y is about more than looking after kids. ... Through leadership and academic enrichment programs such as mentoring,

Resources:

The following internet links have been gleaned from personal communications
combined with information from public institutions and athletic organizations/
associations that have a web presence with information concerning team and
individual sports programs:


Sports Specialization
PDF  High School Coaches Handbook
PDF   Schooling of Elite Skaters
Adult Recreation & Competitive Activities
Child Care Programs
Comparison of Athletes in Different Sports
Athlete Skill Progression
Retiree Mentoring Aspiring Athletes
The Elderhostel Experience

All materials are copy protected. 
The limited use of the materials for education purposes is allowed providing
credit is given for the source of the materials.



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