The Fun of Figure Skating
by Maribel Vinson Owen
 
Introduction

Chap. 1 Equipment

Chap. 2 First Strokes
    First Time
    Double Sculling
    Pushing Off
    Forward Stroking
    Stopping
    Forward Crossovers
    Skating Backward
    Back Crossovers

Chap. 3 Basic Edges
    F. Inside Spirals
    F. Outside Spirals
    Spread Eagles
    Back Outside Spirals
    Back Inside Spirals
    Inside Mohawks
    Forward Outside 3's
    Exercises

Chap. 4 Four Rolls
    Forward Outside Rolls
    Forward Inside Rolls
    Back Outside Rolls
    Back Inside Rolls
    Waltz Eight
    Man's 10-Step

Chap. 5 School Figures
    Forward Outside 8
    Forward Inside 8
    Preliminary Test
    Back Outside 8
    Forward Changes
    Threes-to-Center
    USFSA First Test

Chap. 6 Completing Fundamental Figures 
    Back Inside 8
    Forward Outside 3s
    Back Changes
    Forward Inside 3s
    Basic Theory

Chap. 7 Free Skating
    Basic Spirals
    Dance Steps
    Basic Spins
    Basic Jumps
    Free Skating Program

Chap. 8 Ice Dances
    Dutch Waltz
    Fiesta Tango
    Fourteen Step
    American Waltz

Chap. 9 Skater

Source - 
World Figure Skating

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Chapter 4. Four Rolls -
Forward Inside Rolls

The inside forward roll (Illus. 20) is started in the same way. Push off into the number 1 position of the RIF spiral (20-1) (most starts in skating are made to the right foot) and reverse your free leg and arms at the halfway mark (20-2) after counting 1,2, 3, etc. The same bend and rise, the same upright posture. The hips face squarely forward throughout.

In the number 2 position (20-3, 5) feel your weight on the skating shoulder, with your skating hip "hollowed" in under you. Also feel as if your free foot is pressing to the outside of the circle in front, while you lean slightly back after it passes; this backward lean is to counterbalance the weight of your free leg in front and should be done on the outside roll as well, to maintain even balance on the back of your blade and prevent any tendency you may have to collapse forward.