The Fun of Figure Skating
by Maribel Vinson Owen
 
Introduction

Chap. 1 Equipment

Chap. 2 First Strokes
    First Time
    Double Sculling
    Pushing Off
    Forward Stroking
    Stopping
    Forward Crossovers
    Skating Backward
    Back Crossovers

Chap. 3 Basic Edges
    F. Inside Spirals
    F. Outside Spirals
    Spread Eagles
    Back Outside Spirals
    Back Inside Spirals
    Inside Mohawks
    Forward Outside 3's
    Exercises

Chap. 4 Four Rolls
    Forward Outside Rolls
    Forward Inside Rolls
    Back Outside Rolls
    Back Inside Rolls
    Waltz Eight
    Man's 10-Step

Chap. 5 School Figures
    Forward Outside 8
    Forward Inside 8
    Preliminary Test
    Back Outside 8
    Forward Changes
    Threes-to-Center
    USFSA First Test

Chap. 6 Completing Fundamental Figures 
    Back Inside 8
    Forward Outside 3
    Back Changes
    Forward Inside 3
    Basic Theory

Chap. 7 Free Skating
    Basic Spirals
    Dance Steps
    Basic Spins
    Basic Jumps
    Free Skating Program

Chap. 8 Ice Dances
    Dutch Waltz
    Fiesta Tango
    Fourteen Step
    American Waltz

Chap. 9 Skater

Source - 
World Figure Skating

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Chapter 3. Basic Edges -
Classic Spirals in 4  Positions

When I use the word "spiral," a new skater immediately visualizes a position with the body bent way forward and the free leg very high in back. That is indeed a spiral position, but it is an arabesque spiral and not the classic variety that I want you to learn at this point in your skating education.

A spiral is neither more nor less than one of the basic four edges skated on either the left or the right foot, held in upright posture with good speed for at least a full circle, and prefer­ably longer. It is called a spiral because if you hold an edge without changing even a fraction the angle of the body lean, the radius of the curve you are making will gradually narrow, or spiral in, as your speed diminishes.

Note: This position in 2012 is referred to as a leg extension with the free leg held either in front or behind the tracing made by skating blade.